Transformed E. coli colonies dot the entire surface of this agar plate, waiting to be plucked, streaked onto a new plate, and tested for the presence of the plasmid they’re supposed to be harboring. Because the agar plate contains the antibiotic ampicillin, the only way for the cells to grow on the plate is to possess a plasmid from the genetic transformation process (this is called selection). Because degraded antibiotic strength and other possibly defects in the screening process, growing colonies are screened by PCR to ensure they contain the desired plasmid.

Transformed E. coli colonies dot the entire surface of this agar plate, waiting to be plucked, streaked onto a new plate, and tested for the presence of the plasmid they’re supposed to be harboring. Because the agar plate contains the antibiotic ampicillin, the only way for the cells to grow on the plate is to possess a plasmid from the genetic transformation process (this is called selection). Because degraded antibiotic strength and other possibly defects in the screening process, growing colonies are screened by PCR to ensure they contain the desired plasmid.

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